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View Facing History's "Meeting Standards with Rich Content" Webinar Recordings

Thank you to the educators who participated in Facing History’s three-part webinar series, “Meeting Standards With Rich Content,” which featured strategies to help meet literacy standards from Facing History’s Mini-Task Collection in the LDC CoreTools Curriculum Library.

These strategies engage students with rich content while they read and view for evidence, discuss complex texts, and meet college and career readiness standards.

If you were unable to attend, here are links to recordings of the three webinars presented this fall:


Thank you to our partners at Facing History for making this great professional learning opportunity available to K–12 educators across the country. We look forward to additional events in 2016!

 

 

Jeannie Sharkey Professional Development 852 December 21, 2015

Thank you to the educators who participated in Facing History’s three-part webinar series, “Meeting Standards With Rich Content,” which featured strategies to help meet literacy standards from Facing History’s Mini-Task Collection in the LDC CoreTools Curriculum Library. These strategies engage students with rich content while they read and view for evidence, discuss complex texts, and meet college and career readiness standards.

If you were unable to attend, here are links to recordings of the three webinars presented this fall.

This Is What Learning Looks Like: LDC Demo Day at Stevenson Elementary

Visitors to R. L. Stevenson’s second LDC Demonstration Day on November 13th left the Merritt Island, Florida campus describing their experience as "inspiring," "amazing," "awesome"— and other glowing terms. One Florida educator noted, "I am speechless... I wish my administrator were here!" 

Now in the third year of their LDC journey, Stevenson educators—led by Principal Michael Corneau and Assistant Principal Cindy Vanderpool—stand as shining examples of what can happen school-wide when passionate teachers focus on implementing deliberate practices that help students take ownership of their learning through engaging, collaborative work.

According to Principal Corneau, "Our work as educators is exciting. LDC has helped to ignite the passion for teaching as well as to study more deeply how students learn." He added that he hoped visitors to LDC Demo Day would consider joining the journey and using the LDC curriculum design model to help advance students' knowledge and readiness as they prepare for college and career.

A hands-on instructional leader, who was first exposed to LDC during an initial orientation and training presented by the National Literacy Project (NLP) in summer 2013, Michael has guided his teachers in developing rigorous and relevant standards-based lessons that comprise a literacy-saturated curriculum. Ranked as one of the nation's top 100 elementary schools, Stevenson Elementary was proud to welcome 80 visitors from several districts across the state, as well as educators from Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

LDC Executive Director Chad Vignola, Principal Michael Corneau, Representative Steve Crisafulli, & NLP Executive Officer Dr. Judith IrvinThe day opened with a welcome by Principal Corneau, followed by remarks by Area Superintendent Dr. Laura Rhinehart, NLP Executive Officer Dr. Judith Irvin and Brevard NLP Partner Chris Morris.

LDC.org staff members, including Executive Director Chad Vignola, Chief of Instruction & Design Dr. Suzanne Simons, and Director of Partnerships & Professional Learning Barb Smith, greeted visitors and shared their enthusiasm for the great work accomplished by Corneau and his staff in little more than two years. 

 

 

 

 Florida Representative Steve Crisafulli, Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives—whose children attend Stevenson Elementary—was also on hand. Representative Crisafulli praised Stevenson educators, telling them "what you're doing is working." He went on to cite Stevenson as an exemplary example of "challenging our kids and raising the bar," noting that what's happening here should be taking place across the state.

  

Students at Stevenson Elementary Eager to Share Their Learning, LDC Demo Day

 

LDC Demo Day provided visitors with an opportunity to visit K–6 classrooms, as well as LDC art and music classrooms. LDC modules presented during the visits included: "In Engineering We Trust," "What Goes Up Must Come Down," "Adaptation in 3-D," Interdependence Extended," "I will Survive, The Flora and Fauna Edition," "Influence on Modern Music," and others. The modules that were showcased at the event are works in progress; the goal—once Stevenson educators have completed them—is to eventually create a collection in LDC CoreTools. 

 

Collaborative Learning at Stevenson Elementary, LDC Demo Day

 

A heartfelt "thank you!" to Michael and his staff for inviting interested educators to Stevenson Elementary and providing them with an opportunity to see firsthand what learning looks like in LDC classrooms. 

 


Read What Stevenson Elementary Educators Are Saying About LDC 

 

Jeannie Sharkey Celebrating Teachers 835 December 8, 2015

Visitors to R. L. Stevenson’s second LDC Demonstration Day on November 13th left the Merritt Island, Florida campus describing their experience as "inspiring," "amazing," "awesome"— and other glowing terms. One Florida educator noted, "I am speechless... I wish my administrator were here!"

Common Assignment Study Webinar Wrap-Up

Thank you to all who attended the LDC in Action webinar: Lessons Learned from the Common Assignment Study. Presenters included: Renee Boss, Initiative Director, The Fund for Transforming Education in Kentucky; Amy Spicer, Director of Professional Learning, The Colorado Education Initiative; Gary McCormick, Project Manager for the Common Assignment Study, Kenton County School District (KY); and Michelle Logan, Professional Learning Team Liaison, Thompson County School District (CO).


If you missed the Common Assignment webinar, you can access the recording and resources here:


The Common Assignment Study (CAS) was conceived to facilitate multi-district, multi-state collaboration among teachers within participating districts and states during the transition to new college- and career-readiness standards. Teachers came together to create PLCs to develop common units with embedded LDC modules, and performance-based assessments—with a focus on robust ways to document deeper student learning and promote student engagement. CAS offers a collaborative model that enables meaningful teacher collaboration and is grounded in student and teacher work. The study also illustrates how LDC can be flexibly used in a larger context. 

Beginning in the summer of 2013 with two districts each in Kentucky and Colorado, 6 cross-state teams of 8 teachers per team convened that first year to create and implement two units. Face-to-face convenings were expanded by virtual collaborations. By the second year, multiple districts in both states participated, focusing on revising modules that had been implemented in Year One.

 

According to CAS Project Manager Gary McCormick, “With CAS and LDC, we’ve seen organic spread from participating teachers to their colleagues, who liked what they saw and found the work to be impressive enough that they implemented their own modules. “ He noted that the work done in the CAS underscores not only the power of collaboration, but also the power of using student work as a way to refine the unit and instruction—not just mastery.

 

Professional Learning Liaison, Michelle Logan agreed, saying “CAS has shifted what they [Thompson County Schools] do as a district. They have organically expanded into different content and grades. CAS has helped teachers to look at student work and examine their practice in a systematic way to determine what students really need.”

She added that results to date are showing that students are retaining the transferrable skills as they move from one grade to the next. In one instance, internal data showed a 30% increase from the district’s fall assessment to the spring CAS assessment using the same rubric—which has prompted other teachers to embrace the project and participate.

 

Although the formal research project is phasing out, the work continues on a statewide basis in Year Three in both Colorado and Kentucky. In Colorado, teams are implement existing units and designing new ones, and several new districts are now using CAS tools and LDC modules.

The Kentucky teams are not only teaching existing units and designing new ones, but are also engaging in ongoing Next Generation Instructional Design (NGID), exploring interdisciplinary unit design and module development, as they work to embed CAS into a larger system of instructional transformation.

One of the areas where participants will continue to collaborate across states is through a committee of teachers who will evaluate the new units created in each state. Both Kentucky and Colorado are now working with elementary teachers to create units with embedded LDC modules. Participants from both states continue to create and publish LDC collections featuring their teachers’ fine work.


Access the Common Assignment Study Webinar Recording and Other Resources:

 

 

Jeannie Sharkey LDC Modules 789 October 23, 2015

Thank you to all who attended the LDC in Action webinar: Lessons Learned from the Common Assignment Study. Presenters included: Renee Boss, Initiative Director, The Fund for Transforming Education in Kentucky; Amy Spicer, Director of Professional Learning, The Colorado Education Initiative; Gary McCormick, Project Manager for the Common Assignment Study, Kenton County School District (KY); and Michelle Logan, Professional Learning Team Liaison, Thompson County School District (CO). If you missed the Common Assignment webinar, you can access the recording and resources here...

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